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Book Review :Title: Citizenship Education for Cameroon Schools 

Title: Citizenship Education for Cameroon Schools
Authors: Atabong Joseph, Nkwellekang Primus & Mbongale Lucas
Publisher: ANUCAM Educational Books Plc, 2013
Pages: 400
Reviewer: Azore Opio

 

CameroonPostline.com — Today, when Cameroon is famous for endemic corruption, graft and human rights abuse, it takes a real effort to recall what she was like in her republican heyday. Hence to bring the full power of civic responsibility to bear on the problem of decadence on the course of good government, the demand for a wide-ranging picture of the whole of citizenship in modern times came to fruition when ANUCAM Educational Books Plc published Citizenship Education for Cameroon Schools.
 

The book is designed not only to teach students to pass their Citizenship Education examinations, but to also bring into focus some of the societal duties and obligations of the Cameroonian citizen and the governors. It is a valuable national conspectus of civic education filling in one gap in the Cameroonian’s knowledge on the subject.
 

Citizenship Education for Cameroon Schools is simplified for popular consumption and embodies a wealth of information ranging from group/community dynamics to gender, minority issues and globalisation. Beautifully delineated with carefully planned chapters and delicately sub-titled, making reading a delight, the book offers the contemporary student simple easy-to-grasp language adorned with illustrations with Cameroonian backgrounds. In offering the contemporary student an easy way out, the authors portioned the book into three sections.
 

Section A: The Citizen, Group and Community Dynamics, has a collection of topics such as how to become a citizen [Cameroonian], the civic and moral duties of a child, divorce and family protection, the school, the village and the town, the organisation of councils, the environment.
Section B delves into the political and economic life of Cameroon and Section C pays great attention to universal values with emphasis laid on human rights, peace and conflict management as well as globalisation.
 

Each chapter ends with sample revision questions. There is little question that the revision questions would “render aid’ to students by compelling them to step back into the main text from time to time, thereby ensuring a thorough perusal of the subject at hand.
 

It is probably too soon to attempt a comprehensive assessment of the book’s impact on the appreciation of civic education in Cameroon but it is a timely publication with conceptual precision which exemplifies, in fine detail, the syllabus for Citizenship Education in Cameroon prescribed by government. The book is already listed in the O’ Level syllabus and will, therefore, be used by the various schools in the country.
 

The book’s great value consists in the relationship of one part to another, which thereby facilitates its use particularly in espousing good citizenship practices. It is an unbeatable publication in as far as citizenship education in Cameroon is concerned. Those aspiring to write competitive examinations into public, para-public and private institutions will find an invaluable companionship in Citizenship Education for Cameroon Schools.
 

Apart from a few printer’s devils and some blotches, Citizenship Education for Cameroon Schools will, without a doubt, secure a place in the history of citizenship education in Cameroon. The book is now available in all the major bookshops nationwide.
 

First published in The Post print edition no 01467
 

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